Have you ever wanted to be a kinder person? There are times when I am driving in rush hour traffic, or dealing with a tantrum, and my tension boils over. I get so worked up that it can take hours to calm down. Those are the times that I really want to be a kinder person, because I hate that feeling in my chest from tension and anger. That’s when I want peace and joy in my heart. And The Kindness Givers’ Formula: Four Simple Steps for Making a Transformational Difference for Good has been key in helping me find more peace in my life.

 

The Kindness Givers’ Formula

 

When I found this book, The Kindness Givers’ Formula, I was curious. I know that kindness comes from a feeling of peace. But did you know it also grows that feeling? Could there actually be a kindness formula? There is, and Randy has that formula down. He even includes stories to help reinforce the concepts. I found it to be an insightful book that I want to share with my family and friends. So I decided a book review was in order.

 

I love this book. When I started reading, I felt like Randy was repeating the thoughts I had been having over the past several months as I watched the world around me. The Kindness Giver’s Formula is a quick read, and is so intuitive that I feel like I can immediately go out in my life and implement it. Often you read a book and the concepts are so cerebral that even though it’s a good read, it’s nearly impossible to do anything with it. But I walked away from this book with the simple steps memorized and a solid plan to move forward.

 

All Around Me

 

I can’t tell you how much kindness has jumped out to me since I started reading this book. I have noticed the woman at the check stand who takes the time to smile at me as I stand in line behind her. I see the kids at the park taking turns. And I’m even noticing stories in the news about kindness.

 

Did you know that being kind can help you live longer? It’s true! In fact, the BBC published an article on it on Veterans Day. They highlight the staff at UCLA’s Bedari Kindness Institute that studies kindness from a scientific standpoint.

 

The biological, psychological, and social consequences of kindness are what they focus on. They have learned some amazing things about what kindness does for the human body. I’m talking about real, physiological responses to something previously thought as useless.

 

 

Science Found It Too

 

Columbia University doctor Kelli Harding elaborates with what she calls “the rabbit effect“:

 

“[Kindness] helps the immune system, blood pressure, it helps people to live longer and better. It’s pretty amazing because there’s an ample supply and you can’t overdose on it. There’s a free supply. It’s right there.”

 

Explaining the title of her book, “The Rabbit Effect” she says: “I heard about this study of rabbits, back in the 1970’s. One set had better outcomes and they wanted to find out what was going on. It turned out the rabbits doing better were under the care of one really kind researcher.

 

“As a doctor, I was absolutely shocked. It felt like there was an urgent message.”

 

Kindness, she says, can “turn a lot around and help people navigate things in their world”.

 

With that important insight in mind, I want to share a bit about The Kindness Giver’s Formula without ruining it for you. Before I do, though, I must share how quotable this book is. I love this one:

 

“Unleashing kindness is the most effective way to restore the light, love, unity and peace that dispel hate and all of its derivatives.”

 

Kindness Grows Kindness

 

Amelia Earhart once said, “A single act of kindness throws out roots in all directions, and the roots spring up and make new trees.” After reading The Kindness Giver’s Formula, I am seeing new trees of kindness springing up in my life. I find I am more patient when dealing with stressful things and I look for chances to include others.

 

In fact, we just had my son’s birthday party. We had it at the community center, and as the boys played before the party started, I noticed a new boy join our group. He wasn’t with siblings or other friends, and I knew that when we started the gathering, he would be alone. I could tell that he was on the spectrum like my son and his friends. I also knew that I had arranged for ten kids to be at the party and we only had nine. It was easy and fun to include him in our group, and I am so grateful I did.

 

Adding to Your Circle

 

My son had a blast and enjoyed having his new friend join us. His cute new friend even came up to me after the party and apologized for not bringing a gift. I laughed because neither of us even knew he would be coming five minutes before the party started. But including him warmed my heart like nothing else had.

 

To read more of Abby’s articles in her Living in Harmony column, click here.

The steps in The Kindness Givers Formula are simple and easy to include in a busy life. I have seen a difference in my life after reading it. I highly recommend it to anyone looking to live a life closer to the Savior. I feel like kindness is the key to heavenly thoughts and behavior. We need more of it in our world, and in our families. Please read the book, please adopt more kindness in your life. You won’t regret it.

 

If you’d like your own copy, it’s super affordable on Amazon. I got three to share with my family members!

 

About Abby Christianson
Abby is capable and caring. She is learning more about Autism and parenthood every day. And even though she is the first to admit she makes a lot of mistakes, she is so grateful to be on this journey. She comes from a family with many autistic members. She invites us to join her, as she shares her adventures. She wishes to emphasize that Autism is a difference not a defect. If you or a family member have autism, Abby wants you to know that this isn't a bad thing. And you or your loved one are not sick or broken. Together we will teach the world this new language.

Copyright © 2019 LDS Blogs. All Rights Reserved.
This website is not owned by or affiliated with The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (sometimes called the Mormon or LDS Church). The views expressed herein do not necessarily represent the position of the Church. The views expressed by individual users are the responsibility of those users and do not necessarily represent the position of the Church. For the official Church websites, please visit LDS.org or Mormon.org.